Farming For Boys : What They Have Done, and What Others May Do, in the Cultivation of Farm and Garden, How to Begin, How To Proceed, and What to Aim At. Edmund Morris.
Farming For Boys : What They Have Done, and What Others May Do, in the Cultivation of Farm and Garden, How to Begin, How To Proceed, and What to Aim At
Farming For Boys : What They Have Done, and What Others May Do, in the Cultivation of Farm and Garden, How to Begin, How To Proceed, and What to Aim At
Farming For Boys : What They Have Done, and What Others May Do, in the Cultivation of Farm and Garden, How to Begin, How To Proceed, and What to Aim At
Farming For Boys : What They Have Done, and What Others May Do, in the Cultivation of Farm and Garden, How to Begin, How To Proceed, and What to Aim At
Farming For Boys : What They Have Done, and What Others May Do, in the Cultivation of Farm and Garden, How to Begin, How To Proceed, and What to Aim At

Farming For Boys : What They Have Done, and What Others May Do, in the Cultivation of Farm and Garden, How to Begin, How To Proceed, and What to Aim At

Boston: D Lothrop Company, 1881.

Illustrated by Illustrated. Hardcover. Good+ with no dust jacket. Item #14638

Top corner dampstain affecting text margins, cock, cover soil, owner's signature, otherwise light wear. Solid hardcover. ; Illustrated, and with an attractive decorated cover. "This little volume has been prepared to counteract, to some extent, this prevalent disposition for encouraging our youth to exchange the country for the city, - to convince those already living in the former that their future respectability and happiness will be best promoted by remaining where they are, as well as to impress on the minds of city parents that they will be doing for their sons an acceptable service by cultivating in them a love for country life in place of that for a city one. I have set before them striking examples of the general superiority of agricultural employments, of their comparative freedom from temptation to vice, of the sure rewards they bring to intelligently directed industry, and shown that it is a great mistake to suppose that all who exchange the farm for the city become either good, or great, or even rich. The fact is made manifest, in the personal history of a multitude of distinguished men, that the farm, and not the city, has been the birthplace of the leading minds of all countries. To ... The mass of farmers' boys understand that they must carve out their own fortunes. If their parents would afford them some little opportunity to begin early, - an equal one with the sharp newsboy of the city, - they too would become so shrewd, so self-reliant, so expert at acquisition, even on the farm, that, educated to moderation, they would be too well satisfied with small gains to be overcome by the seductions of city life." - author's Preface. Originally published in 1868, this later nineteenth-century Lothrop printing captures the essence of both basic agricultural education and "how do you keep them on the farm?". ; (xi), 286, 2 ad pages.

Price: $49.95

See all items in Children's And Juvenile
See all items by